An all-natural take on the traditional Christmas wreath

“You can use items you have at home that you don't want to get rid of."

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

An all-natural take on the traditional Christmas wreath

Written by: Julia Perla Huisman
November 26, 2018


Wreaths by Kris Livovich of Sugarfield Flowers 

There are a thousand different ways to make a Christmas wreath, but Chesterton florist Kris Livovich of Sugarfield Flowers recommends using found and foraged objects—mixed with flowers from a florist—to build a wreath that is both environmentally sound and unlike anything you’d find elsewhere. 

“You can use items you have at home that you don’t want to get rid of, but don’t quite have a use for,” Livovich says. “I’ve tapped into my collection of tiny animals that sit in a drawer, or I’ll use dried flowers from a special event that we can’t throw away.” 

The great outdoors offers abundant options for dressing a wreath as well; you just have to know where to look. And please practice responsible foraging. “Avoid taking plants from private property or conservation areas unless you have explicit permission,” Livovich says. “Be aware of the environmental status of a plant you intend to gather—if it is endangered, leave it alone. Better to harvest invasive or abundant plants that regenerate quickly.” 

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

Using foraged, bought and recycled materials you can make an elegant, simple wreath. A stay from an old barrel becomes the hoop, antlers found in the backyard the focal point, and one bunch of eucalyptus purchased from your favorite florist the foliage. Flat metal hoops like this are difficult to attach greens and large items to, so use zip ties. They attach quickly and easily. 

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

Using foraged, bought and recycled materials you can make an elegant, simple wreath. A stay from an old barrel becomes the hoop, antlers found in the backyard the focal point, and one bunch of eucalyptus purchased from your favorite florist the foliage. Flat metal hoops like this are difficult to attach greens and large items to, so use zip ties. They attach quickly and easily. 

Succulents, dried moss and wood come together to make a sweet little woodland creature centerpiece. Cut succulents last for a couple of weeks out of water, removing the need for dirt and watering a centerpiece where you might not want spills. Leave the succulents in place until they start to sprout roots, then simply place them on the surface of a pot of damp succulent soil. They will root themselves. 

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf
Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

Succulents, dried moss and wood come together to make a sweet little woodland creature centerpiece. Cut succulents last for a couple of weeks out of water, removing the need for dirt and watering a centerpiece where you might not want spills. Leave the succulents in place until they start to sprout roots, then simply place them on the surface of a pot of damp succulent soil. They will root themselves. 

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

This simple wreath can be made with foraged greenery and a few stems of your favorite dried flowers. If your wreath won’t be exposed to wind and weather, you can bind dried flowers with covered wire, or tuck stems into the grapevine itself. This is a good use for dried flowers we’re not quite ready to part with.  

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

This simple wreath can be made with foraged greenery and a few stems of your favorite dried flowers. If your wreath won’t be exposed to wind and weather, you can bind dried flowers with covered wire, or tuck stems into the grapevine itself. This is a good use for dried flowers we’re not quite ready to part with.  

Buy a simple grapevine wreath and pinecone garland from your local florist, cut a few low-hanging branches from an evergreen on your property, or someone else’s (with permission), and you have a statement piece to last the whole season! If using foraged pinecones, roast them at 250 degrees for 30-45 minutes to kill any bugs and to smooth the sap that may be on them, making them less sticky.  

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf
Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

Buy a simple grapevine wreath and pinecone garland from your local florist, cut a few low-hanging branches from an evergreen on your property, or someone else’s (with permission), and you have a statement piece to last the whole season! If using foraged pinecones, roast them at 250 degrees for 30-45 minutes to kill any bugs and to smooth the sap that may be on them, making them less sticky.  

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

A mix of fresh flowers and foraged foliage will dry in place, giving you a Victorian feel all through the season. While fresh, use them in a prominent location for a party or events. If you are planning on allowing your fresh flowers to dry in place, move them to a spot where they won’t be moved or bumped. Dried flowers are beautiful, but fragile.   

SUGARFIELD FLOWERS
Based in Chesterton
sugarfieldflowers.com

Photo Credit: Brad M. Wolf

A mix of fresh flowers and foraged foliage will dry in place, giving you a Victorian feel all through the season. While fresh, use them in a prominent location for a party or events. If you are planning on allowing your fresh flowers to dry in place, move them to a spot where they won’t be moved or bumped. Dried flowers are beautiful, but fragile.   

SUGARFIELD FLOWERS
Based in Chesterton
sugarfieldflowers.com