Midwest haven for hippies at heart

"It’s a reflection that everything has beauty in it."

Photo Credit: Rainstorm Photo

Midwest haven for hippies at heart

Written by: Amanda Wilson
November 16, 2018


Cornelia Baum is most at peace when she’s free to roam. From early childhood on, the creator of Boho Living and roadsideYOGA traveled throughout her neighborhood and across the country in search of satisfying her wayfaring impulse. “Looking back, I’ve always had that wanderlust, free spirit,” she recalls. When bike riding and sleepovers didn’t satisfy her itch to roam, an 8-year-old Baum convinced her mom to allow her to travel by plane with an older cousin to stay with family in Las Vegas.  

The urge to travel and dream freely stuck with Baum. Her creative and professional journey spans different industries and locations across the U.S.; it includes singing engagements at sporting events for the White Sox, Atlanta Braves, Denver Rockies, Chicago Fire, many DePaul sporting events, and countless weddings. She’s worked at an advertising agency, recording studio audio production, and full post production company, as well as with the MS Run the US relay organization. 

The side effects of Cornelia Baum’s incurable case of wanderlust include macramé creations, workshops, and yoga lessons that soothe free spirits from California to Northwest Indiana. But, like Baum, Boho Living isn’t limited to one location and it’s more than its creations and courses. 

“Boho Living isn’t just macramé or jewelry,” Baum says. “It’s a lifestyle that sums up me and the goals I have in life.” Baum’s eclectic creations include feathered macramé earrings and wall hangings made with all-natural materials and dyes. She also offers macramé workshops as well as yoga lessons. She splits her year between living in California and Northwest Indiana, and Boho Living and roadsideYOGA reflect that duality of California dreams and Midwest authenticity.   

Photo Credit: Rainstorm Photo
Cornelia Baum
Photo Credit: Rainstorm Photo
Cornelia Baum

Cornelia Baum is most at peace when she’s free to roam. From early childhood on, the creator of Boho Living and roadsideYOGA traveled throughout her neighborhood and across the country in search of satisfying her wayfaring impulse. “Looking back, I’ve always had that wanderlust, free spirit,” she recalls. When bike riding and sleepovers didn’t satisfy her itch to roam, an 8-year-old Baum convinced her mom to allow her to travel by plane with an older cousin to stay with family in Las Vegas.  

The urge to travel and dream freely stuck with Baum. Her creative and professional journey spans different industries and locations across the U.S.; it includes singing engagements at sporting events for the White Sox, Atlanta Braves, Denver Rockies, Chicago Fire, many DePaul sporting events, and countless weddings. She’s worked at an advertising agency, recording studio audio production, and full post production company, as well as with the MS Run the US relay organization. 

The side effects of Cornelia Baum’s incurable case of wanderlust include macramé creations, workshops, and yoga lessons that soothe free spirits from California to Northwest Indiana. But, like Baum, Boho Living isn’t limited to one location and it’s more than its creations and courses. 

“Boho Living isn’t just macramé or jewelry,” Baum says. “It’s a lifestyle that sums up me and the goals I have in life.” Baum’s eclectic creations include feathered macramé earrings and wall hangings made with all-natural materials and dyes. She also offers macramé workshops as well as yoga lessons. She splits her year between living in California and Northwest Indiana, and Boho Living and roadsideYOGA reflect that duality of California dreams and Midwest authenticity.   

Love of family kept Baum in her hometown of Lansing, Illinois, yet her heart ached for California. Baum’s dad advised her to follow her heart, go west, and live her life, which Baum did for a while before her dad’s declining health caused her to return to Chicago. She traveled back and forth between California and Chicago with her relay organization job before her dad passed away.  

Making a decision between staying in Chicago and going back to California was next to impossible. “I was in love with the West Coast, but loved my family and was torn with what to do,” she says. Baum decided not to choose between the two and to stay true to both of her heart’s passions by splitting her time during the year between Chicagoland and California. While here, she resides in Lansing and has her workshop space in Crown Point. 

Photo Credit: Rainstorm Photo
Photo Credit: Rainstorm Photo
Photo Credit: Rainstorm Photo
Photo Credit: Rainstorm Photo

She discovered her love for yoga and macramé during what initially appeared to be career lows. Baum’s short residency in St. Louis included a job that didn’t work out with a newly discovered love for yoga, and she funneled this love and expertise into caring for the relay runners’ well-being with one-on-one yoga sessions through roadsideYOGA. When she was laid off from her studio job, Baum first started making jewelry to keep busy before she learned how to do macramé.  

She recalls the disconnect she felt in making “smart” career decisions that felt hollow, but says macramé immediately felt right. “I like that, in a way, macramé is structured because you have to use multiples of four and calculate out your pieces. But, you get to be creative with that. It’s just rope and string, and can turn into something beautiful. It’s a reflection that everything has beauty in it, just tied and turned in different ways.” 

For Baum, macramé is meditation, because it allows her to reset. “Macramé can be super-repetitive so that you have to pay attention to the design you’re creating, but it allows for your mind to be occupied so that it doesn’t run away with all sorts of thoughts . . . especially negative ones.”  And, just as macramé is more than just rope and strings, it’s more than wearable and displayed art; it’s the stories of those who used to make macramé and the ones who want to learn. “Women who did macramé in the sixties and seventies love to talk about their days as free spirits,” Baum says. “The younger generation has the same ‘free spirit bite’ that I do.” 

That same vibe abounds from coast to coast, and Baum recently bought a 1975 Argosy Airstream with the intent to capture it on video. “I want to drive it around the country and shoot videos for my roadsideYOGA while living the boho life and continuing to make macramé,” she says. Whether on the road or at market, Baum loves her clients’ and followers’ free-spirit stories. “When I’m at market and I see someone’s eyes light up when they see my pieces, I just know they are going to tell me a story about when they used to macramé.”  

FIND IT HERE
To view Baum’s products and learn more about her yoga classes, visit boholiving.store