An artist’s guide to decorating an Easter egg

An artist’s guide to decorating an Easter egg

March 16, 2018


Egg decorating is as synonymous with Easter as chocolate is to the Easter bunny. This year, you can dye your eggs like everyone else or you can turn them into a work of art. Designer and artist Suzy Galazka of Griffith shares how to get creative with your eggs, no matter your skill level. 

HOW TO BLOW OUT AN EGG

To make your egg art last, it’s best to blow out the egg so you don’t have to worry about the yolk going bad. Here’s the step-by-step process. 

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Egg decorating is as synonymous with Easter as chocolate is to the Easter bunny. This year, you can dye your eggs like everyone else or you can turn them into a work of art. Designer and artist Suzy Galazka of Griffith shares how to get creative with your eggs, no matter your skill level. 

HOW TO BLOW OUT AN EGG

To make your egg art last, it’s best to blow out the egg so you don’t have to worry about the yolk going bad. Here’s the step-by-step process. 

Step 1
Eggs usually have one end that’s smaller and pointier. Using a needle or a push pin, pierce the smaller end first, then the other end. The holes then need to be made bigger so you can get the egg contents out. Make the hole you are going to blow through a little larger (a nail works here as well). Then make the end hole slightly larger, about twice the size of the first hole, as this is where the egg contents will flow out. Go slow and gentle, picking away near the hole.

Step 2
Reach through the larger hole with a needle, wire, straightened paper clip or toothpick. Pierce the yolk and break up the membranes that keep it whole. Gently push the instrument in and out of the hole repeatedly. Tip: One way to help prevent cracking when drilling the holes in the egg is to place Scotch tape or an adhesive plaster/Band-Aid on the egg at the piercing point.

Step 3
Take a small coffee straw for best results and insert it in the hole on the smaller top side. Blow air through the straw and into the egg, letting the insides flow out from the larger hole. Or you can put your mouth to one of the holes and blow. Do this until the egg is empty. 

Step 4
Take a glass of water and pour it over the eggshell to rinse it out. Then take your straw or syringe to blow out the water and any remaining egg yolk/white. Shake gently and repeat until the egg is completely clean. You’ll want to do this over a bowl––if you’re saving the eggs for later use, set up a separate wide bowl for catching the water, or just do it over the sink. 

Step 5 
Dry the intact eggshells. Optionally, put all eggshells in the microwave on high for 15 to 30 seconds or bake them at 300 degrees for 10 minutes. This may help to make them stronger. Alternatively, you can let them drain (larger hole facing downwards) for 2 to 3 days.  

… and done! 

The eggs are now ready for decorating. You can also buy blown-out eggs on Etsy to save some time. 

Photo Credit: Brad Wolf
Photo Credit: Brad Wolf

DECORATING TIPS

-You can use bits and scraps of paper, wire and cotton to create little embellishments for your egg characters. A scrap of construction paper can become a tie or a bow. I used cotton balls rolled in paint to give the hair texture. Found objects are the best! I used some tiny shells from my last trip to Florida and they made an excellent little headband for one of the characters. 

-If you aren’t really good at painting a tight edge, no worries! Take a Sharpie and outline your paint for a nice clean look.   

-Not a painter? Use stamps to create patterns instead. On one of the eggs, I used a few letter stamps to create a repetitive pattern, giving it a geometric look. The letters “O” and “V” were used to create the pattern shown.   

-Different paint brushes create different textures—dab and paint! Practice on a piece of scrap paper to see what shape your brush will give you. The rectangular shapes on one of the eggs was used by just pressing a flat brush against the egg. If you are painting eggs that will be peeled and eaten, make sure you are using non-toxic paints. 

Photo Credit: Brad Wolf
Photo Credit: Brad Wolf
Photo Credit: Brad Wolf
Photo Credit: Brad Wolf

ABOUT THE ARTIST
Suzy Galazka is an illustrator, graphic designer and stylist. View her work at cosmicsuzy.com